Snæfellsnes

Vatnajökull (Vatnajokull)
January 17, 2017
Þingvellir (Thingvellir)
January 16, 2017
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Snæfellsnes

This 90- km long peninsula offers diversity like few other. Friendly towns and villages, spectacular mountains, sea birds in close view, beaches of sand and souring ocean. Many hiking trails for all kind of hikers.

The Snaefellsjokull National Park is at the westernmost part of the peninsula, including the mystical glacier Snaefellsjokull, as well as other unique sites such as Djupalonssandur, Thufubjarg and more.
In 2008, the communities of Snaefellsnes Peninsula were the first in Europe to receive certification from Green Globe, an international benchmarking system for sustainable travel and tourism.

Snæfellsjökull National Park was established on June 28th, 2001.The Park’s purpose is to protect and conserve the area’s unique landscape, indigenous plants and animal life as well as the important historical relics. At the same time, the Park is meant to allow visitors easier access as well as an improved opportunities to get to know the area. National parks are amongst Iceland’s finest assets and everyone is free to explore them.The Snæfellsjökull glacier lies within the national park, and the park is the only Icelandic national park that stretches to the sea. The geology of Snæfellsnes national park is diverse with formations from almost every era of Iceland’s past. The more prominent formations in and around the National Park mainly date from geologically “modern” times back to the last ice age. The hills to the north of the glacier, around Bárðarkista, are of volcanic palagonite tuff, formed during eruptions under the glacier or below the surface of the sea. Svalþúfa is most likely the eastern section of a crater that erupted under the sea, while Lóndrangar is a volcanic plug